Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Lecture notes of 5 disruptive forces in higher education lecture

The following are lecture notes from a lecture by Jeff Selingo

He started out by talking about 1999-2009.   He called it "decade of more".  Over the last decade colleges have increased tuition & program offering.  With the huge increase in attendance their was little desire to keep tuition down.  Institutions took on institutional debt (US Colleges/Universities have $307B in debt).  Students were willing to go to any college and pay for any degree.



He identified 5 disruptive forces

Thoughts on completion rates.    His thesis is since most states are bellow average the national level support is poor.
He also thinks brand loyalty is going to decline because people are swirling around more than before to bundle together their degree on their terms.

States are divesting.

New "free" teaching styles are coming online.  At the same time the student pocket book is being pinched:

57% of public says higher education system is doing fair/poor value for the money spent
76% of college presidents say higher e education system is doing excellent/good value for money spent


Public wants to know the value.  They no longer want / believe subjective "get an education and have a better life".  They want data.

Strategy - The public wants to know:


1)  Will I learn:
   Reviewed the book "Academically Adrift" by Arum and Roksa.  Found rigor of course of study (reading and writing) is a key to retention and value.  Found questionable value in  the legacy learning styles (low retention of knowledge).

2)  Will I get a job:

3)  What Universities are worth it (Virginia, Tennessee, others are doing this based on legislative mandate, expect other states to pick this up in the next 2-3 years) :


4) What Programs at the are worth it:


"The only really necessary people in the publishing process now are the writing and the reader." - Amazon
"The only really necessary people in the education process now are the professor and the student." - Now

Most at risk in coming disruption:  
    Commodity courses
    The bundled one-size-fits-all experience
    The credential.

The least at risk in coming disruption:  
   Maturing students, 
   Research,  
   Student Professor relationship.

1 comment:

  1. Thanks for the summary! I hope to find the recording of the full webinar since I was unable to attend. I found this in particular to be very interesting:

    57% of public says higher education system is doing fair/poor value for the money spent
    76% of college presidents say higher e education system is doing excellent/good value for money spent

    What a disconnect in goals between the two parties represented her!


    Sarah Linden

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